Mathcentre

A site I use frequently is mathcentre which was developed by a group from the Universities of Loughborough, Leeds and Coventry, the Maths Stats and OR Network and the Educational Broadcasting Services Trust. See this link for a list of topics. Reading about the news from mathcentre I see there are leaflets available mathcentre  and statstutor showing the range of resources available.

mathcentre - quotient rule

mathcentre – Maths Tutor

Looking at the second page of the mathcentre leaflet, I noticed mathtutor which provides mathcentre resources conveniently structured as a course.  I shall refer my students to that this week, I want them to look at the quotient rule in my absence (I’m very much looking forward to the annual TSM residential workshop at Keele University) and plan to point them in the direction of resources they can use – a flipped approach! (See ‘Prepare ahead‘ here). I’ll see what they have learned on my return.

The mathcentre site includes extensive resources. Many of my students like the quick reference leaflets which are available on numerous topics. There are also teach yourself booklets, revision booklets, videos and diagnostic tests. Resources are available for staff and students. This is a site well worth exploring and recommending to your students.

Websites for Students…and more!

One of the most popular posts on this blog is Top >10 Mathematics Websites. It struck me that it might be useful to think about my top recommendations for students; once again using some categories as well as individual sites gives me the excuse to mention more than 10! So for your students:
Top >10 Mathematics Websites for Students

Back to the teachers!

I have mentioned TED-Ed before with its collection of Mathematics videos, note the feature now offered by TED-Ed to ‘find and flip’ which allows you to use a video and turn it into a lesson; see ‘Flip This Video’.

Looking at some videos, it struck me that something like  Gaurav Tekriwal’s The magic of Vedic Math would be ideal to tinker with! (These ‘tricks’ can make ideal starters, I have linked to some further videos on this page on Number on Mathematics Starters.)

On the subject of videos and TED, have you heard Ken Robinson’s latest talk,
How to escape education’s death valley?

TED-Ed

From TED who provide free and inspiring video talks comes a new education channel: Ted-Ed YouTube ChannelNew videos will be added regularly, the introductory video explains TED’s aims for this education initiative.

It is possible to browse the videos by subject. There are a number of Mathematics videos currently available and the collection will grow.

My year 10s (UK age 14-15) were impressed with the above video, Hans Rosling’s ‘best stats you’ve ever seen’. We also answered the question he posed near the beginning of the video to see how we compared to the chimpanzees!

Students can try the Gapminder software themselves. A teachers’ page has numerous resources and guides on how to use Gapminder are also available.
It is possible to share a graph, try clicking on the image below to see this graph on Gapminder. You can easily generate different graphs by using the menus available on the axes.
Note the menu on the left of the graph which includes options to browse examples and download a pdf guide.

For further Mathematics videos – see the Videos page.
The TedEd collection has been added to the Evernote shared notebook.

Numbers in love with themsleves!

Watch the video from Numberphile to learn why 153 is in love with itself!

Numberphile launched their first video appropriately on 11th November 2011.

The Numberphile site which has a series of videos from Brady Haran has been added to the Videos collection in this Evernote notebook.

Another recent addition to this collection is PatrickJMT’s – Just Maths Tutorials – an extensive collection for students.

Note that there are suggested collections of videos to direct students to on the videos page of Mathematics For Students.

See also this related post on Mathematics Videos.